How To Use Onedrive App On Macnewpb

  1. Onedrive App Windows 10
  2. Overdrive App
Onedrive-->

There are two basic ways that you, as an administrator, can deploy the OneDrive sync app to Mac users in your organization:

Onedrive App Windows 10

  • Install and set up the OneDrive sync app by following the instructions in Sync files with OneDrive on Mac OS X. To install the OneDrive sync app for Mac, a user has to be an administrator on the Mac or know an administrator account name and password.

  • Download the installer package file to your local network, and then use your software distribution tools to deploy the app to your users. By using a software distribution tool, you have more control over the deployment, including which users get the sync app and when. The OneDrive sync app for Mac uses the Apple Installer technology for installation allowing you to use the software distribution tools that you normally use to deploy software to Mac users. You can use Microsoft Intune. Other common tools are Jamf Pro, Munki, and AutoPkg. You can also use Apple Remote Desktop and AppleScript.

Jul 03, 2019 First, make sure all the files you need from OneDrive are syncing to that PC. To do this, open the OneDrive System Tray icon and select Settings. At the Settings screen, click the tab for Account. First, make sure all the files you need from OneDrive are syncing to that PC. To do this, open the OneDrive System Tray icon and select Settings. At the Settings screen, click the tab for Account. Get OneDrive cloud storage to protect your files and access them across all your devices. Download and install the Microsoft OneDrive app for PC, Mac, iOS, and Android. Get OneDrive cloud storage to protect your files and access them across all your devices. Skip to main content.

Manage OneDrive settings on macOS using property list (.plist) files

After the OneDrive sync app for Mac is installed, users can configure settings for the app. These settings are called preferences. As an administrator, you might want to provide users in your organization with a standard set of preferences. Preferences for the OneDrive sync app for Mac are stored in preference files. These files are often referred to as '.plist files'.

StandaloneMac App Store
Plist location
~/Library/Preferences/com.microsoft.OneDrive.plist
~/Library/Containers/com.microsoft.OneDrive-mac/Data/Library/Preferences/com.microsoft.OneDrive-mac.plist
Domain
com.microsoft.OneDrive
com.microsoft.OneDrive-mac

Configure sync app settings

Configure the settings on macOS as follows:

  1. Quit the OneDrive app.

  2. Define the settings you want to change by creating a Plist file with the values. You can also use a script to set the default values.

  3. Deploy the settings onto the local computer.

  4. Refresh the preferences cache.

    On the next start of OneDrive, the new settings will be picked up.

Overview of settings

Use the following keys to preconfigure or change settings for your users. The keys are the same whether you run the standalone or Mac App Store edition of the sync app. However, the Plist file name and domain name will be different. When you apply the settings, ensure that you target the appropriate domain depending on the edition of the sync app.

List of settings

AllowTenantList

This setting prevents the users from uploading files to other organizations by specifying a list of allowed tenant IDs. If you enable this setting, the user gets an error if they attempt to add an account from an organization that isn't in the allowed tenants list. If the user has already added the account, the files stop syncing. This setting takes priority over Block syncing OneDrive accounts for specific organizations setting. Do NOT enable both settings at the same time.

The parameter for the AllowTenantList key is TenantID and its value is a string, which determines the tenants for whom the Allow Tenant setting is applicable. For the setting to be complete, this parameter also requires a boolean value to be set to it. If the boolean value is set to True, the tenant is allowed to sync.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>AllowTenantList</key>
<array>
<dict>
<key>TenantId1</key>
<Bool>True</Bool>
<key>TenantId2</key>
<Bool>True</Bool>
</dict>
</array>

AutomaticUploadBandwidthPercentage

This setting enables the sync app to automatically set the amount of bandwidth that can be used for uploading files, based on available bandwidth.

To enable this setting, you must define a number between 1 and 99 that determines the percentage of bandwidth the sync app can use out of the total available bandwidth.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>AutomaticUploadBandwidthPercentage</key>
<int>(Bandwidth)</int>

BlockExternalSync

This setting prevents the sync app from syncing libraries and folders shared from other organizations.

Set the setting's value to True, to prevent the users from syncing OneDrive, SharePoint libraries, and folders with organizations other than the user's own organization. Set the value to False or don't enable the setting to allow the OneDrive, and SharePoint files to be synced with other organizations also.

Overdrive App

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>BlockExternalSync</key>
<(Bool)/>

BlockTenantList

This setting prevents the users from uploading files to organizations that are included in the blocked tenant IDs list.

If you enable this setting, the users get an error if they attempt to add an account from an organization that is blocked. If a user has already added an account for a blocked organization, the files stop syncing. This setting does NOT work if you have Allow syncing OneDrive accounts for only specific organizations setting enabled. Do NOT enable both settings at the same time.

Enable this setting by defining IDs for the TenantID parameter, which determines the tenants to whom the block tenant setting is applicable. Also set the boolean value to True for the ID of every tenant you want to prevent from syncing with the OneDrive and SharePoint files and folders.

Note: In the list, inclusion of the tenant ID alone doesn't suffice. It's mandatory to set the boolean value to True for the ID of each tenant who is to be blocked.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>BlockTenantList</key>
<array>
<dict>
<key>TenantId1</key>
<Bool>True</Bool>
<key>TenantId2</key>
<Bool>True</Bool>
</dict>
</array>

DefaultFolderLocation

This setting specifies the default location of the OneDrive folder for each organization.

The parameters are TenantID and DefaultFolderPath.The TenantID value is a string that determines the tenants to whom the default folder location setting is applicable.The DefaultFolderPath value is a string that specifies the default location of the folder.

The following are the conditions governing the default folder location:-Mac app store: The path must already exist when the user is setting up the sync app.-Standalone: The path will be created (if it doesn't already exist) after the user sets up the sync app. Only with the Standalone sync app you can prevent users from changing the location.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>DefaultFolder</key>
<array>
<dict>
<key>Path</key>
<string>(DefaultFolderPath)</string>
<key>TenantId</key>
<string>(TenantID)</string>
</dict>
</array>

DisableHydrationToast

This setting prevents toasts from appearing when applications cause file contents to be downloaded.

If you set the setting's value to True, toasts do not appear when applications trigger the download of file contents.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>DisableHydrationToast</key>
<(Bool)/>

DisablePersonalSync

This setting blocks user from signing in and syncing files in personal OneDrive accounts. If this setting has been configured after a user has set up sync with a personal account, the user gets signed out.

If you set the setting's value to True, the users are prevented from adding or syncing personal accounts.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>DisablePersonalSync</key>
<(Bool)/>

DisableTutorial

This setting prevents the tutorial from being shown to the users after they set up OneDrive.

If you set this setting's value to True, the tutorial is blocked from being shown to the users after they set up the OneDrive.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>DisableTutorial</key>
<(Bool)/>

DownloadBandwidthLimited

This setting sets the maximum download throughput rate in kilobytes (KB)/sec for computers running the OneDrive sync app.

Set this setting's value to an integer between 50 KB/sec and the maximum rate is 100,000 KB/sec that determines the download throughput in KB/sec that the sync app can use.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>DownloadBandwidthLimited</key>
<int>(Download Throughput Rate in KB/sec)</int>

FilesOnDemandEnabled

This setting specifies whether Files On-Demand is enabled.

Important

We recommend keeping Files On-Demand enabled. See all our recommendations for configuring the sync app

If you don't set this setting, Files On-Demand will be enabled automatically as we roll out the feature, and users can turn the setting on or off.

If you set this setting to True, FilesOnDemand is enabled and the users who set up the sync app can view the online-only files, by default.

If you set this setting to False, FilesOnDemand is disabled and the users won't be able to turn it on.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>FilesOnDemandEnabled</key>
<(Bool)/>

HideDockIcon

This setting specifies whether a dock icon for OneDrive is shown.

If you set this setting's value to True, the OneDrive dock icon is hidden even if the app is running.

Use

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>HideDockIcon</key>
<(Bool)/>

HydrationDisallowedApps

This setting prevents apps from automatically downloading online-only files. You can use this setting to lock down apps that don't work correctly with your deployment of Files On-Demand.

To enable this setting, you must define a string in JSON format as described below:
[{'ApplicationId':'appId','MaxBundleVersion':'1.1','MaxBuildVersion':'1.0'}]
'appID' can be either the BSD process name or the bundle display name. 'MaxBuildVersion' denotes the maximum build version of the app that will be blocked. 'MaxBundleVersion' denotes the maximum bundle version of the app that will be blocked.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>HydrationDisallowedApps </key>
<string> [{'ApplicationId':'appId','MaxBundleVersion':'1.1','MaxBuildVersion':'1.0'}, {'ApplicationId':'appId2','MaxBundleVersion':'3.2','MaxBuildVersion':'2.0'}]</string>
<(Bool)/>

OpenAtLogin

This setting specifies whether OneDrive starts automatically when the user logs in.

If you set this setting's value to True, OneDrive starts automatically when the user logs in on Mac.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>OpenAtLogin</key>
<(Bool)/>

SharePointOnPremFrontDoorUrl

This setting specifies the SharePoint Server 2019 on-premises URL that the OneDrive sync app must try to authenticate and sync against.

To enable this setting, you must define a string containing the URL of the on-premises SharePoint Server.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>SharePointOnPremFrontDoorUrl</key>
<string>https://Contoso.SharePoint.com</string>

SharePointOnPremPrioritizationPolicy

This setting determines whether or not the client should set up sync for SharePoint Server or SharePoint in Microsoft 365 first during the first-run scenario when the email is the same for both SharePoint Server on-premises and SharePoint in Microsoft 365 in a hybrid scenario.

If you set this setting's value to 1, it is an indication that OneDrive should set up SharePoint Server on-premises first, followed by SharePoint in Microsoft 365.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>SharePointOnPremPrioritizationPolicy</key>
<int>(0 or 1)</int>

SharePointOnPremTenantName

This setting enables you to specify the name of the folder created for syncing the SharePoint Server 2019 files specified in the Front Door URL.

If this setting is enabled, you can specify a TenantName that is the name the folder will use in the following convention:
OneDrive – TenantName (specified by you)
TenantName (specified by you)

If you do not specify any TenantName, the folder will use the first segment of the FrontDoorURL as its name. For example, https://Contoso.SharePoint.com will use Contoso as the Tenant Name in the following convention:


OneDrive – Contoso
Contoso

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>SharePointOnPremTenantName</key>
<string>Contoso</string>

Tier

You can configure the OneDrive Standalone sync app to receive delayed updates.

PList Location
Domain
~/Library/Preferences/com.microsoft.OneDriveUpdater.plist
com.microsoft.OneDriveUpdater
SettingDescriptionParametersExample Plist Entry
Tier
Defines the update ring for the computer
UpdateRing (String): This parameter has two different values.
Production - The default update ring for OneDrive updates.
Insiders - This update ring receives updates that are 'pre-production' and that allow you to play with features before they are released. Note that builds from this ring may be less stable.
Enterprise - This update ring (now called 'Deferred') receives updates after they have been rolled out through the Production ring. It also lets you control the deployment of updates. For more information about the update rings and the procedure used by the sync app for checking for updates, see The OneDrive sync app update process.
<key>Tier</key>
<string>(UpdateRing)</string>

Important

We recommend selecting several people in your IT department as early adopters to join the Insiders ring and receive features early. We recommend leaving everyone else in the organization in the default Production ring to ensure they receive bug fixes and new features in a timely fashion. See all our recommendations for configuring the sync app

UploadBandwidthLimited

This setting defines the maximum upload throughput rate in KB/sec for computers running the OneDrive sync app.

To enable this setting, set a value between 50 and 100,000 that is the upload throughput rate the sync app can use.

The example for this setting in the plist file is:
<key>UploadBandwidthLimited</key>
<int>(Upload Throughput Rate in KB/sec)</int>

-->

Microsoft OneDrive is a robust but simple-to-use cloud storage platform for small businesses, enterprises, and everything in between. Unlike other cloud storage providers, most of the advanced enterprise-focused features in OneDrive are available for every subscription type, enabling organizations to use OneDrive in whatever way benefits them the most. This guide focuses on the deployment and configuration options that make the most sense for small businesses looking to use OneDrive. From there, these organizations can select whatever additional management capabilities they require. For the full deployment guide, which contains other methods of deploying, configuring, and managing OneDrive, see OneDrive guide for enterprises.

Getting started with OneDrive

OneDrive is effective in even the largest enterprises, but it still has a small, easy-to-implement footprint that small businesses can take advantage of. After all, small businesses are often at highest risk for losing files on failed devices because few are concerned with centralized storage and backups. By using OneDrive, however, your small business can keep files safe, and your users can easily access them from all their devices.

To get started with OneDrive, follow these steps:

  1. Review basic OneDrive information. Start by reviewing the introductory OneDrive information available at the OneDrive help center. You'll get answers to many of your questions, including the OneDrive experience and how it works.

  2. Set up a Microsoft Office 365 subscription. You must set up a subscription to use OneDrive, but you aren't required to purchase all the applications in the Microsoft 365 suite. To get started, follow the steps in Set up Microsoft 365 Apps for business.

  3. Add OneDrive licenses. Review your plan options in Compare OneDrive plans, and then add the licenses you need.

When you've completed these tasks, you're ready to plan for, deploy, and configure the OneDrive sync app and applications. To do that, complete these three simple steps: Dmg buffalo stuff out plot index.

  1. Plan for adoption. For small businesses, planning for user adoption can be as simple as individually showing your users how to use OneDrive. Often, small business customers don't consider this step for new applications, and that can negatively affect the application's success. The section Adopt OneDrive provides helpful resources for OneDrive adoption.

  2. Install and configure. Sync app are available for the Windows and macOS operating systems that provide a seamless experience for users interacting with their files. Most small businesses start by installing the sync app on their users' devices, and then consider the OneDrive mobile apps later. In fact, you may already have the OneDrive client on your devices. Devices running the Windows 10 operating system and devices running Windows or macOS with Microsoft Office 2016 or later will have the OneDrive sync app already. For information about how to install and configure the OneDrive sync app and mobile apps, see the section Install and configure OneDrive.

  3. Manage OneDrive. For many small businesses, managing OneDrive is optional. You could simply install and configure OneDrive and leave it at that. If you want to use advanced features of OneDrive or add device sharing or access restrictions, however, you can easily manage those and other settings in the OneDrive admin center. For more information about managing OneDrive, see the section Manage OneDrive.

Key OneDrive features for small businesses

Unlike most other cloud storage providers, OneDrive not only provides robust features to small businesses out of the box, but it also makes most of its advanced features available to them. This gives small businesses the flexibility to use advanced features based on the needs of their organization.

The features listed in this section address common customer concerns or specific compliance requirements, or provide unique functionality available only in OneDrive. For a full list of features available across OneDrive plans, see Microsoft OneDrive.

Note

The information in this section is for awareness purposes only and is not required to install and use OneDrive.

OneDrive Files On-Demand

OneDrive Files On-Demand enables users to view, search for, and interact with files stored in OneDrive from within File Explorer, without downloading all the files to their device. The feature provides a seamless look and feel for both OneDrive and local files without taking up space on the local hard drive. As shown in the following screenshot, files that have not been downloaded have a cloud icon for their status. For those files that have been downloaded, the status shows a green checkmark.

By default, files are downloaded only when you need to access them. However, if you plan to access a file while disconnected from the internet, simply make the file available offline by right-clicking it, and then selecting Always keep on this device. Alternatively, if you want to free space on your device and remove the downloaded copy of a file, right-click the file, and then select Free up space. The following screenshot shows the right-click menu for OneDrive files on a device running Windows.

For more information about OneDrive Files On-Demand, see Learn about OneDrive Files On-Demand.

Modern attachments

OneDrive integrates with Microsoft Outlook to enable easy sharing of OneDrive files that appear just like email attachments. This feature provides a familiar sharing experience but centralizes storage of attachments in OneDrive. This allows your users to all collaborate on the same file instead of sending different versions back and forth in email. In addition, you can configure sharing permissions on the files directly from within the Outlook client.

To reduce the potential for confusion when users choose to add a copy versus a link to attached OneDrive files, you can set the default behavior of the Outlook client, as demonstrated in How to control default attachment state when you attach a cloud file in Outlook 2016.

Files Restore

The OneDrive Files Restore feature lets users restore files to any point over the past 30 days. To select the desired recovery time, OneDrive presents you with a histogram that shows file activity so that you can determine which recovered time meets your needs. From there, simply select the file history entry to which you want to restore, and all changes after that point will be rolled back.

In addition, because the histogram shows individual activity on a file, you can use this feature to quickly view your files' modification history. For more information about this feature, see Restore your OneDrive.

Recycle bin

OneDrive has a recycle bin similar to the one available on the Windows desktop. Deleted files are moved to the recycle bin and kept for a designated time before being permanently deleted. For work or school accounts, deleted files are purged after 93 days unless configured otherwise. For a demonstration of how the recycle bin works, see Restore deleted files or folders in OneDrive.

Known Folder Move

Known Folder Move enables users to select Windows known folders, such as their desktop, Documents, or Pictures, to automatically synchronize to OneDrive. You can add this feature during the initial setup of OneDrive or after it has been configured. This capability provides a simple migration option for users looking to add known folders to their existing list of synchronized folders. For more information about Known Folder Move, see Protect your files by saving them to OneDrive.

Adopt OneDrive

User adoption is important to the overall success of any new application. Ideally, to feel that you have maximized your investment in Office 365 and OneDrive, you need to maximize user engagement with them. For small businesses, driving user adoption can be as simple as introducing users to OneDrive when you're installing it or showing them any of the videos available at the Office 365 Training Center.

Personally showing your users how to save and share documents in OneDrive tends to be the most effective option for driving adoption, given that you'll likely be performing manual installations. The primary value proposition for small businesses is file availability and redundancy. A document saved on local storage can be lost with a device; a document saved to OneDrive cannot. Simply having this discussion with your users beforehand, coupled with demonstrating the application's ease of use, can drive positive outcomes for this effort.

For information about a more formal Microsoft 365 user adoption strategy, see the Microsoft 365 End User Adoption Guide. For more information about driving user engagement through a similar, more formal process, see Success Factors for Office 365 End User Engagement. You can also contribute to or comment on adoption-related ideas in the Driving Adoption Tech Community.

Install and set up OneDrive apps

You can upload, download, and interact with your OneDrive files from a web browser, but the ideal OneDrive experience comes from the Windows and Mac sync apps and the iOS and Android mobile apps. With these clients and apps, saving files to OneDrive and interacting with them is much easier than visiting a website each time you need something. Through this experience, you can seamlessly integrate OneDrive into your existing file interaction experiences.

You can install OneDrive on any supported device. For small businesses, manual installations typically make the most sense. For some devices, the installation process may be as simple as installing an app from the app store. For others, you may need to delete older versions of OneDrive first. This section walks you through the installation and configuration of OneDrive on iOS and Android mobile devices, Windows devices, and computers running macOS. You may not need to install OneDrive on all these platforms, depending on the devices used in your organization.

Most small businesses start by installing the OneDrive sync app on users' Windows and macOS devices, and then consider the OneDrive mobile apps afterwards. You don't need to install and configure OneDrive on all your devices before you start using it.

Install and configure the sync app on a Windows device

If your Windows device has either Office 2016 or Windows 10, it already has the OneDrive sync app.

For devices running older versions of Windows or on which Office 2016 is not installed, you can download the OneDrive sync app for Windows from https://onedrive.live.com/about/download.

Note

If the device has an older version of the sync app, you'll be asked to uninstall it when you install the new one.

Configuring OneDrive for Windows is simple, but if you want to see a demonstration, see Sync files with the OneDrive sync app in Windows

Install and configure OneDrive on a macOS device

To install the OneDrive sync app on a computer running macOS, just follow the steps in Sync files with the OneDrive sync app on Mac OS X. The setup experience is similar to that for Windows. For more information about OneDrive on macOS, see OneDrive for Mac – FAQ.

Install and configure OneDrive on a mobile device

Installing the OneDrive app on a mobile device is simple: download the app from the app store on any Android, iOS, or Windows mobile device. If you want to simplify the manual installation process even further, go to https://onedrive.live.com/about/download and enter the mobile phone number of the device on which you want to install OneDrive. Microsoft will send a text message to the mobile device with a link to the app in the device's app store. Once installed, start the configuration process by opening the app and responding to the prompts.

To learn how to perform tasks in OneDrive on an iOS device, see Use OneDrive on iOS.

To learn how to perform tasks in OneDrive on an Android device, see Use OneDrive on Android.

Manage OneDrive

Many small businesses use OneDrive without changing any of the options.

If you want to add some basic device and sharing restrictions to OneDrive, you can use the OneDrive admin center. To access the new OneDrive admin center, go to https://admin.onedrive.com. There, you can restrict the people with whom your users can share files, choose the devices your employees can use to access OneDrive, and more.

Settings in the OneDrive admin center are grouped into six categories:

  • Sharing. On the Sharing page, you can configure the default sharing link users send out to colleagues to share a file. For example, when users share a file, you can specify that the default sharing type is Internal.

    You can also change the external sharing settings to prevent users from sharing files with people outside your organization. This is useful if you have a lot of confidential information.

  • Sync. On the Sync page, you can configure sync restrictions based on file type, require that synced devices be joined to your domain, or restrict synchronization from computers running macOS.

  • Storage. On the Storage page, you specify the default OneDrive storage limit for users within your Office 365 organization. You can also configure how long to keep data for users whose accounts have been deleted (the maximum value is 10 years).

  • Device Access. On the Device Access page, you can restrict device access to OneDrive based on network location and apps that don't use modern authentication, among other application management options.

  • Compliance. The Compliance page provides a centralized list of links to auditing, data loss prevention (DLP), retention, ediscovery, and alerting capabilities within Office 365 that are applicable to OneDrive. (Most small businesses won't use these options.)

    Selecting an item's link redirects you to the Office 365 Security & Compliance Center, where you can configure that item. You can create DLP policies from templates that protect certain types of data, such as Social Security numbers, banking information, and other financial and medical content. For a walkthrough of how to create DLP policies in Office 365 and apply them to OneDrive, see Create a DLP policy from a template.

  • Notifications. On the Notifications page, you define when OneDrive owners should receive notifications about sharing or accessing their data. These settings are helpful for small businesses that likely don't have IT staff who can audit this information. For information about enabling these options, see Turn on external sharing notifications for OneDrive.

Get help with OneDrive

If you need help with OneDrive, you have many ways to find solutions to common issues or request help:

  • Tech community. Find helpful information from other customers in the community by reviewing the discussions in the OneDrive Tech Community and the Microsoft OneDrive Blog.

  • Support documentation. For a list of recent issues in OneDrive and how to resolve or work around them, see Fixes or workarounds for recent issues in OneDrive. For getting started info, see Get started with OneDrive, Employee file storage (video training) and Why use OneDrive to store your docs.

  • Microsoft Support. If you need help from Microsoft to troubleshoot an issue or configure or deploy OneDrive, see Contact Microsoft.

  • OneDrive UserVoice. You can review and submit feature requests and provide feature feedback at OneDrive UserVoice.